In this session, we will outline the servers that you will need to build and configure to complete the series. If you are unsure where to start in the process, please refer back to one of the previous posts:

We are now going to spend a little time inside the Hyper-V environment and I will map out the servers I created and the configurations for each. These will be the same machines that I will use to set up Claims Based Authentication and the external services farm, later in this series. Please make a note of any deviations you make, as these will need to be accounted for as you progress in the series.

We will be creating the following virtual images for our internal architecture:

  • MCM-ADFS
  • MCM-DC1
  • MCM-Services
  • MCM-SPS1
  • MCM-SQL1

We will be creating the following virtual images for our external architecture:

  • EXT-ADFS
  • EXT-DC1
  • EXT-Client

For those of you who have never created a Hyper-V environment, I will give you a brief break down, but I would encourage you to review the following article on MSDN: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc732470(WS.10).aspx.

To create and set up a virtual machine

  • Open Hyper-V Manager. Click Start, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Hyper-V Manager.
  • From the Action pane, click New, and then click Virtual Machine.
  • From the New Virtual Machine Wizard, click Next.
  • On the Specify Name and Location page, specify what you want to name the virtual machine and where you want to store it.

 

  • On the Memory page, specify enough memory to run the guest operating system you want to use on the virtual machine. For the Domain Controllers and ADFS servers, I am using 512 MB. My laptop has 16 GB of RAM, so I will allocate 2 GB to each machine while I am getting things configured and then will scale them appropriately once I have everything working the way I want.

 

  • On the Networking page, connect the network adapter to an existing virtual network if you want to establish network connectivity at this point. Select ‘LAN’ as your network connection. We will be adding the ‘WIFI’ after the machine is created. These network connections were created and explained in the previous post for Configuring RRAS.

 

 

Note

If you want to use a remote image server to install an operating system on your test virtual machine, select the external network.

  • On the Connect Virtual Hard Disk page, specify a name, location, and size to create a virtual hard disk so you can install an operating system on it.
  • On the Installation Options page, choose the method you want to use to install the operating system:
    • Install an operating system from a boot CD/DVD-ROM. You can use either physical media or an image file (.iso file).
    • Install an operating system from a boot floppy disk.
    • Install an operating system from a network-based installation server. To use this option, you must configure the virtual machine with a legacy network adapter connected to an external virtual network. The external virtual network must have access to the same network as the image server.

 

 

  • Click Finish.

After you create the virtual machine, you can start the virtual machine and install the operating system.

Step 3: Install the operating system and integration services

In the final step of this process, you connect to the virtual machine to set up the operating system. As part of the setup, you install a software package that improves integration between the virtualization server and the virtual machine.

 

Note:

In this series, all of the images for servers will be using Windows Server 2008 R2. We will be installing Windows 7 for the client machine.

We will now go through each of the images and set the network configuration. You will need to run DCPROMO on your domain controller and follow the steps. I created a new forest for Server 2008 R2 and used ‘mcm2010.internal.mcm’ as my domain name for the internal farm and ‘company.external.mcm’ for my external set up.

Over the next couple of steps, we go through the screens of creating a domain controller, so if you are familiar, skip down a few screenshots.

To promote your server to a domain controller, open up a command prompt and type: dcpromo.

 

When the installation wizard starts, check ‘Use advanced mode installations’ and click ‘Next’.

 

From here, follow the screen shots listed below as you go through the wizard.

 

In this process, we will be creating two separate domain controllers. The screenshot below is showing the creation of the external farm (company.external.mcm).

 

Here you will receive a message stating that the computer has dynamically assigned IP addresses. Click ‘Yes’ to proceed.

 

Follow the remainder of the wizard to complete the set up.

 

 

 

 

 

Add a virtual network to each of the machine. This is done by clicking ‘Settings’ on your virtual image as shown below for MCM-DC1:

 

We want to add a network adapter for both LAN and WIFI as explained in the previous post for Configuring RRAS. We will be configuring the LAN and the WIFI in the next step.

 

We will be configuring the properties of the ‘LAN’ connection for ‘Internet Protocol Version 4’. The ‘WIFI’ will be left alone. The domain controller looks like the following.

As you work through each of these machines, add them to your domain. The domain used in this article is ‘mcm2010.internal.mcm’ for the internal farm and ‘company.external.mcm’ for the external farm. You will need to complete the network configuration of the IP Addresses and Preferred DNS server prior to adding the servers to the domain.

 

 

MCM-DC

  • IP Address: 192.168.100.1
  • Subnet mask: 255.255.255.0
  • Preferred DNS server: 127.0.0.1

MCM-SQL1

  • IP Address: 192.168.100.10
  • Subnet mask: 255.255.255.0
  • Preferred DNS server: 192.168.100.1

MCM-SPS

  • IP Address: 192.168.100.20
  • Subnet mask: 255.255.255.0
  • Preferred DNS server: 192.168.100.1

MCM-ADFS

  • IP Address: 192.168.100.2
  • Subnet mask: 255.255.255.0
  • Preferred DNS server: 192.168.100.1

MCM-Services

  • IP Address: 192.168.100.70
  • Subnet mask: 255.255.255.0
  • Preferred DNS server: 192.168.100.1

CO-DC

  • IP Address: 192.168.100.51
  • Subnet mask: 255.255.255.0
  • Preferred DNS server: 127.0.0.1

CO-ADFS

  • IP Address: 192.168.100.52
  • Subnet mask: 255.255.255.0
  • Preferred DNS server: 192.168.101.1

CO-Client

  • IP Address: 192.168.101.53
  • Subnet mask: 255.255.255.0
  • Preferred DNS server: 192.168.101.1
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4 thoughts on “Building your SharePoint 2010 Infrastructure

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